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healthy grains

Grains for a Low-Carb Diet

Unlike the saying “You can’t have your cake and eat it too,” when it comes to carbs, you can have your carbs and eat them too. Even though you want to lose weight, you can still have some kinds of carbs – just not the usual fare made from bleached, white flour. These carbs are also packed with protein.healthy grains

It has been discovered through research that people who eat whole grains every day weigh a little less than their counterparts who eat just refined grain foods. One thing to commit to memory though is the fact that just because a food label says “whole grain” does not really mean that it is healthy. Many products with the label only have just about 51 percent whole grain flour.

The following are some of the kinds of carbs that are best when trying to lose weight if you do not want to give up carbs completely:

brown rice

brown rice

pearled barley

pearled barley

Brown Rice: Plain brown rice has almost no salt content and a great amount of minerals and fiber. Any food expert or dietician will tell you to replace white rice with it.

Pearled Barley: Barley is not made for soups only. Some researchers have discovered that if barley is taken in the morning for breakfast, the fibrous grain cuts the response of blood sugar by about 45% at lunch and about 15% at dinner. Your energy and hunger levels will be more stable if your sugar spikes are lesser.

 

rolled oats

rolled oats

Rolled Oats: Instant oatmeal is actually rolled oats that are cut up to cook faster. The old-fashioned oatmeal rolled into flakes takes just about 5 minutes to cook. Oats are among the simplest means of adding more fiber into your diet. They lower chances of high blood pressure, heart disease and diabetes while delivering a protein power for building muscle. But be careful of the sugar in ‘Flavored’ instant oatmeal. Be sure to choose the plain type sweetened with fruit.

quinoa

quinoa

Quinoa: A grain from South American that has close to two times the amount of protein in it than brown rice, and its protein is made up of essential amino acids and complete set of branch chain, which makes it a great choice for building muscle and tissue. With all the protein it contains together with a small amount of healthy fat as well as a relatively small amount of carbs, help ensure a low effect on blood sugar. Its supple and nutty taste isn’t hard to handle for even choosy eaters. Also, it cooks exactly like rice, and is ready in 15 minutes.

 

steel cut oats

steel-cut oats

Steel-Cut Oats: Unrolled oats, nutty and delicious although it takes long to cook them—about 30 minutes, except when you soak them overnight. However, they merit the effort and extra time input. It takes longer for the enzymes in your gastrointestinal tract to pass through the unrolled oats. As a result, there is slower glucose uptake that makes steel-cut oatmeal better, particularly for those that are at risk of diabetes.

muesli

muesli

Muesli: A Swedish protein-and-fiber punch blend of dried fruits, rolled oats and nuts. Even though  a cup is about 300 calories, the benefit of extensive minerals and vitamins makes it a fantastic meal.

kamut

kamut

Kamut: A substitute for brown rice. It has close to 40% more protein than wheat and has higher degrees of fatty acids – the “good fat” than a lot of grains.

 

 

granola

granola

Granola: Rich in a lot of nutrients but it is becoming almost impossible to find a box of this cool stuff that doesn’t contain just about the same amount of sugar in a plate of cookies. Redirect granola’s wild content of sugar by checking the lane for granola-cereal crossbreed.

teff

teff

Teff: A teff seed will most likely get lost if you drop it. Actually the word “Teff” means “lost” in Amharic—the official language of Ethiopia. Teff is an outstanding alternative of wheat for people suffering from celiac disease, as it does not contain gluten.

buckwheat

buckwheat

Buckwheat: Packed full of nutrients with low carbs. Just one once of it supplies 4 grams of protein and 3 grams of fiber.

 

 

 

farro

farro

Farro: A staple food for Italians of today as well as the Egyptian culture of ancient times. Farro has all of what you require to maintain quality balance in your diet. It contains almost two times the protein and fiber found in brown rice together with iron and calcium. Farro also has a gristly texture and this emotional flavor that makes it very unique.