How To Properly Read Nutrition Facts

by 3J, www.3jsdiet.com

This article will teach you how to properly read nutrition facts.  Many people do not understand how to properly read nutrition facts, leading to miscalculated macros and total calorie count.

Serving size:usda-guide-to-nutrition-labels-ga-1

The first line under the Nutrition facts is the serving size.  The unit of measurement for a serving can be different based on the product, but most all nutrition facts will usually have a gram weight.

Amount Per Serving:

This is the amount of the macro and micro nutrients you will receive from the serving size.  In this case, the serving size is 172g.  Every time you eat 172g of the product, you get the nutritional value from the information listed below the amount per serving.

Calories:

Here is where people get confused, remember that you get the number of calories, carbs, fats, etc. that are listed PER SERVING.  The serving amount her is 172g which is just a little over 6oz.  If you eat 12oz of the product then you are getting twice what is shown in the nutrition facts.  Thats twice the protein, twice the carbs, twice the fats, etc..

Total Fat:

Gives the total fat intake of each serving.  Do not be fooled by the 0 trans fat reading.  The FDA has strange requirements from companies that let them slip by with trans fats.  I have seen peanut butter that says 0 trans fats yet specifically has the words “hydrogenated” or “partially hydrogenated” in the ingredients.  If you see these words in the ingredients, know that your eating trans fats!

Cholesterol:

Gives the amount of cholesterol the product with provice

Sodium:

Sodium is simply salt.  Its the amount of salt in the product. Be weary of salt intake! You should be aiming for 2000-3000mg of salt daily.  Some foods have a very high salt content.  Soy sauce is a perfect example. Soy sauce can have 300-500mg of salt per tablespoon!

Total Carbohydrate:

Gives the total amount of carbohydrates that you will ingest per serving.  For those of you who are worried about “impact carbs” or carbs that will cause an insulin spike, pay attention to the dietary fiber listed under total carbohydrates.  Subtracting your total carb intake from the dietary fiber will give you your total “impact carbs.”  Sugars are listed to let you know how much sugar is in the product

Protein:

Gives you the total protein intake per serving

Miconutrients:

The last two rows will give you the vitamins and minerals that you receive from the product.

So what are those percentages to the right of each value?

The FDA requires that nutrition facts are based upon a 2000 calorie diet, and that the percentage of the governments required daily amounts of each value be listed.

No Comments, Comment or Ping

Comments are closed.