Anabolic steroids, bodybuilding discussion forums. - Steroidology

rui products
 

(Forum for members to discuss training information)

Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    GetNSwole
    Guest
    *Help* Looking for documentation on leg work increasing testosterone
    Is it true? Ive heard it.. Does anyone have documentation?

  2. #2
    Amateur Bodybuilder jackcity10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    689
    Rep Power
    11
    yea its supposed to be because you can push so much more weight with your legs so it increases testorsterone. I dont have a link to any study though.

  3. #3
    Senior Member roccodart440's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    4,376
    Rep Power
    11
    I think it's all bullshit and if it is true the difference is neglegable.

  4. #4
    Dont taze me, bro.
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,400
    Rep Power
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by roccodart440
    I think it's all bullshit and if it is true the difference is neglegable.
    we actually agree on something

  5. #5
    Amateur Bodybuilder joshbeam1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    930
    Rep Power
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by roccodart440
    I think it's all bullshit and if it is true the difference is neglegable.
    i disagree. THink...if u're doing 10 reps of 10 w/your biceps or u're doing some heavy pulling on deads or heavy squatting u're demanding alot more from your body. Since your body can naturally adapt to many situations, it only makes sense that your body would naturally produce more test whne doing heavy compound movements. Just my .02 for what its worth
    sorry no documentation 4 this 1
    but ask ne 1 who knows ne thing what u need to do 2 grow
    they'll say eat right, eat alot, do heavy compound lifts, dont' overtrain, rest
    heavy compound lifts play a major factor it getting big, not the small ass shit

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    6,012
    Rep Power
    16
    These two studies show an increase in test with leg work but probably aren't exactly what you are looking for. I'll look for better examples later.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...=pubmed_docsum

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...=pubmed_docsum

  7. #7
    Pro Bodybuilder Behemoth's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,472
    Rep Power
    13
    It doesn't make a significant impact. Just working out in general will increase testosterone. It's not going to give you a steroid like effect or even any decent boost. If you want to see effects like that, you're going to have to take steroids.

  8. #8
    Indiscreet Stalker
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    205
    Rep Power
    11
    i believe the reason heavy compound lifts cause more hypertrophy/strength gains is simply because of the sheer number of muscles involved, not to mention that the greater poundage moved requires the body to adapt to more. i'm not sure about it causing more test release.

  9. #9
    Dont taze me, bro.
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,400
    Rep Power
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by joshbeam1
    i disagree. THink...if u're doing 10 reps of 10 w/your biceps or u're doing some heavy pulling on deads or heavy squatting u're demanding alot more from your body. Since your body can naturally adapt to many situations, it only makes sense that your body would naturally produce more test whne doing heavy compound movements. Just my .02 for what its worth
    sorry no documentation 4 this 1
    but ask ne 1 who knows ne thing what u need to do 2 grow
    they'll say eat right, eat alot, do heavy compound lifts, dont' overtrain, rest
    heavy compound lifts play a major factor it getting big, not the small ass shit
    any increase in hormone levels from squatting is neglible. Its not like squatting = a cycle of test e.

  10. #10
    Rookie
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    6
    Rep Power
    0
    A Study of Endurance versus Resistance Training in Men and Women

    The positive effects of resistance training outweigh the positive effects of endurance training on the overall health of men and women. Resistance training, also known as weight training, has the ability to provide the body with the stimulus it needs to create a leaner physique with more muscle mass.

    A recent gallop poll of 5000 people between the ages of 20 and 60 asked the question “How often do you participate in moderate physical activity that last’s about 20 minutes”? The results are as follows.
    With the majority of Americans not involved with any type of physical activity, this research paper can be utilized as a tool that will allow the novice to make an educated choice when deciding to take on a physical fitness routine.

    Muscle is one of the most adaptable tissues of the body and will grow stronger and larger in response to regular overloading. Muscle will continue to grow as long as the resistance or overload is greater than the previous load. When a desired amount of tone and size is acquired, a maintenance routine would begin. A maintenance routine simply works the muscle with a stress level it is accustomed to, and should not push the body to the point of breaking down muscle fibers.

    When the time comes and the decision has been made to commit to a routine of weight training, a key point to remember is this. “You will want to do the hardest strength building exercises: deadlifts, squats, presses, and rows. Your body will respond by opening the spigot and letting the testosterone flow” (Schuler, Volek, Mejia, and Compbell, 2002). The mechanics of these exercises will not be detailed in this paper, it is suggested that readers familiarize themselves with these terms and seek further instruction regarding proper form and techniques.

    A common misconception that many exercisers hold onto is the belief that muscle growth occurs in the gym, frequently leading to a syndrome known as over training which will be covered later in this paper. Muscle and Fitness (2002) shows that the resting period between workouts is when growth occurs. While in the gym and applying resistance training, the body is in a catabolic state when the body is breaking down molecules for energy to fuel the workout. This state of catabolism occurs when the stress hormone cortisol reaches levels higher than testosterone levels. Creating an anabolic state when the body has the building blocks it needs and is in a resting/repairing state sparks the growth phase where muscle tissue is being repaired and made stronger, this occurs when the testosterone/cortisol ratio is in favor of testosterone.



    With an increase in lean muscle mass, the body responds by raising its metabolism. Thousands of chemical reactions are necessary to keep living cells healthy. The sum of these reactions is called metabolism. Many of the reactions involve breaking down molecules to release stored energy. For example, humans can break down sugar molecules to get energy. Other reactions combine molecules to make larger molecules. When a plant repairs a torn leaf, it is putting together molecules in order to heal itself. (Britannica Student Encyclopedia. Retrieved June12, 2005, from Encyclopedia Britannica Online.)



    Muscle tissue is active, meaning it requires calories to be maintained. On the other hand fat is inactive; it is the storage depot for calories. With the increase in muscle volume, there is an increase in metabolism. This increase is necessary to maintain the active muscle cells. “Since resistance training creates more muscle, you build more tissue that needs calories. If you increase muscle mass while you lose fat, you boost your ability to burn calories” (Gutfeld, G. 1991, p. 60).

    With an increase in metabolism, the body is capable of burning more calories at rest. It is true that during the actual event of the exercise, aerobic exercise usually burns more calories. On the other hand, resistance training has the ability to burn more calories throughout the day, effectively creating a furnace within the body demanding calories 24 hours a day. In other words, increased muscle mass is increased active cells, which again requires fuel (calories) to survive. With aerobic exercise, the increase in metabolism and the need to fuel the furnace lasts only about an hour or so after the exercise is completed. Weight trainers on average burn one third more calories at rest than did groups involved only in aerobic training due to the increase in the resting ********* rate (Gutfeld, G. 1991, p. 60).


    With an increase in level of fitness, increase in muscle mass, and an increase in metabolism, the hormonal system responds by increasing its production of testosterone, growth hormones, and other regulating hormones. Resistance training has been shown to increase the total and free amounts of testosterone (Free testosterone is what is available to interact with androgen receptors, these androgen receptors are what signals muscle growth and other neural activities). The increase in free testosterone after resistance training is dependent upon the volume and intensity of the exercises performed, as well as the amount of muscle mass recruited to perform the exercise. As noted in a study of different types of lifting exercise, it was shown that the greatest amount of testosterone increases (31% increase) were exhibited when performing 4 sets of 6 repetitions of squats the squat is an exercise where the lifter rests a bar behind his or her neck and squats down to where the thighs are at least parallel to the floor, and back up to a standing position, this is one repetition. The lifter used a weight that was 90-95% of the maximum amount for one lift, known as the one rep max (Kraemer & Ratamess, 2005).


    An increase in testosterone benefits both men and women in many ways. The obvious and most common thought that crosses most peoples mind is an increase in sex drive. This is true and affects men and women quite the same way. There is an overall increase in the feeling of well-being, as well as an increase in libido. Another way increased levels of testosterone affects the body is not so obvious, that being cognitive abilities. As shown in the example below, low testosterone levels in both men and women have been shown to decrease mental abilities and higher testosterone levels increase mental abilities.

    Neuropsychologists and endocrinologists at Johns Hopkins University recently tested
    the cognitive skills of 11 men who were visiting the hospital because of problems due
    to unusually low testosterone levels. The researchers gave each man about two
    minutes to solve a sentence puzzle. Then they doled out testosterone supplements and
    tested verbal memory again. The men showed the most fluency when their
    testosterone levels were lowest. After they received hormone supplements, their
    verbal skills actually declined. (Franklin & Lehrman, 1996)

    While this study demonstrates that verbal fluency is decreased when higher levels of testosterone are present, other cognitive abilities are heightened with the increase in testosterone. “Men with normal levels scored higher in spatial abilities--skills useful in engineering, construction, architecture, and design. Women, who also make some testosterone, performed better on spatial tasks if they had higher levels of the hormone”. (Franklin & Lehrman, 1996)

    Growth hormone is also stimulated by increased muscle mass and resistance training. Growth hormones are responsible for the growth of bone and essentially all tissues of the body by stimulating protein synthesis and breaking down fat to provide energy (Britannica Student Encyclopedia. Retrieved June12, 2005, from Encyclopedia Britannica Online.) Like the increase in testosterone, growth hormones need a heavy resistance load and a highly intense workout. Studies have shown that unlike testosterone, growth hormone levels do not stay elevated after resistance exercise
    (Kraemer & Ratamess, 2005). With this knowledge and the desire to increase growth hormone production, it is important to note that while keeping in mind that most weight training sessions should not exceed 90 minutes, the longer the weight training session lasts and the more weight that is lifted increases the amount of growth hormone that is secreted into the blood stream.

    Other hormones that are affected by resistance training regimens in a positive light include insulin which controls levels of blood sugars, Catecholamines which help regulate muscle contractions and energy availability, Cortisol (covered in detail later) and a myriad of other hormones that this paper will not delve into.

    Endurance training has the opposite affect on the body, decreasing lean muscle and ultimately slowing down the metabolism leaving the body in a weakened state. Comparative studies have shown that endurance trained athletes have lower than normal (Up to 60-85% less) free testosterone than their sedentary counterparts. These individuals have usually been distance runners active in the sport for between 1 and 15 years (Hackney, 2001). With the decrease in testosterone an increase in cortisol occurs. Cortisol is a hormone that is necessary and good for our bodies in the normal amounts. During stress both physically and mentally cortisol is released by the adrenal glands.
    In large amounts brought on by extended periods of endurance training such as marathon running, or other prolonged aerobic exercises cortisol can have a negative impact on the body. In fact, it is known to promote weight gain, cause persistent fatigue, and raise blood sugar levels. While it is true that any physical or mental stressor has the ability to increase cortisol output to dangerous levels, we need to look at once again the differences between endurance and resistance training.

    To recap, resistance training has the ability to increase muscle mass, thus increases ********* rates, and hormonal output. In turn, resistance training sparks an anabolic environment by increasing the “building” hormones such as testosterone, growth hormones, and others. This anabolic environment promotes cell growth and maintenance; again it is a growing environment. On the other hand, endurance training will supply the stress that releases large amounts of cortisol, without the muscle building stimuli’s of weight or resistance training. With an increase in cortisol, and no increase in muscle mass, the body is put into a catabolic condition where it is in a constant fight or flight mode, tearing down the building blocks to enable a ready amount of energy in the form of glucose. This glucose is the quick source of energy preferred by the muscle to exert force. Since there is no forceful output on the muscles part, the glucose gets stored in the fat cells usually around the abdomen.

    With all the interest placed on exercise and staying fit, the mentality of more is better is often seen among fitness enthusiasts. When enough turns into too much a syndrome known as overtraining can strike, and with serious consequences. Overtraining is a problem experienced in both the endurance athlete as well as the weight lifter. Overtraining occurs when the body is put into a constant state of stress, in this case physical stress via exercise. The body is never rested and therefore does not recover from the stress of the workout.

    In “Signs of Overtraining” (2004) there are several symptoms that should be watched for. Decreased performance and lowered endurance levels, agitation, moodiness, irritability, and lack of concentration. When the body never has a chance to fully recover and the athlete continues to apply stresses, a feeling of heavy legs, constant muscle pain and achy joints begins to appear. When these signs of overtraining are not taken seriously and the athlete continues to push his or her body to the extreme, the following symptoms will begin to show and seeking a physician’s advice would be recommended. An increased occurrence of upper respiratory infections, inability to sleep, lack of appetite, and an elevated resting heart rate. For women, a disrupted menstrual cycle is a sure sign of overtraining, some may experience irregular periods while others will stop menstruating altogether.


    Avoiding overtraining and ensuring that enough stimulation occurs to spark muscle growth are analogues to fine tuning a musical instrument. The body responds quickly to exercise and is always giving feedback. Listening to the feedback ensures that we will be in tune with ourselves and will make us aware of that fine line between enough and too much. Beginners tend to be over zealous and go all out so let this be a warning to those just starting out as well as a reminder to the experienced. Listen to your body, use intuition, and know when to take a break or when to hit it hard. The optimal amount of time for each training session varies from beginner to elite, but as a general rule, sessions of weight training should be about an hour or less, with a frequency of 3 to 5 days a week.

    With the dramatic differences in the two types of exercises that have been researched in this paper, it should be an easy choice for anyone to make when deciding on what type of fitness program to choose. To support a balanced hormonal system and a healthy body that stays in an anabolic state, the choice of a weight training regimen should now be clear. On the other side, we see that when people choose to do a strict endurance training regimen they tend to lose muscle mass, decrease testosterone, and increase their production of cortisol, prolonging a catabolic environment that will weaken there bodies by constantly tearing down cells for energy, and ultimately storing these torn down cells as fat.












    References

    Basic Training Science: How do your Muscles Grow? (2002, January). Muscle and
    Fitness, 63, 1, S3.

    Franklin, D. and Lehrman, S. (1996) A Hormonal Link to Language. Health, 10, 24

    Growth hormone. Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved June 12, 2005, from Encyclopedia
    Britannica Online. <http://www.search.eb.com/eb/article?tocId=9038236>

    Gutfeld, J. (1991, August). Muscle up your metabolism. Prevention, 43, 60.

    Hackney, C. (2001). Endurance Exercise Training and Reproductive Endocrine
    Dysfunction in Men: Alterations in the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Testicular Axis.
    Current Pharmaceutical Design, 7, 261-273

    Kramer, J. and Ratamess, A. (2005) Hormonal Responses and Adaptations to Resistance
    Exercise and Training. Sports Med, 35, 339-361

    Metabolism. Britannica Student Encyclopedia. Retrieved June 12, 2005, from
    Encyclopedia Britannica Online. [url]http://www.search.eb.com/eb/article?tocId=9038236[/url]

    Schuler, L., Volek, J., Mejia, M., Campbell, A. (2002). The Testosterone Advantage Plan
    New York: Simon & Shuster.

    Signs of overtraining. (2004). Ace top10, 74.

  11. #11
    Amateur Bodybuilder
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    791
    Rep Power
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by roccodart440
    I think it's all bullshit and if it is true the difference is neglegable.
    I agree also....thats all I did was squat back in the day and i got nowhere you know how they say your upper body grows with your lower body by squatting lets just say mine did not.....it did not increase growth for me overall it just increased growth in my legs, period.

Thread Information
Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads
  1. Replies: 17
    Last Post: 03-12-2013, 09:18 PM
  2. By Just Mike in forum Anabolic Steroid Forum
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 10-27-2011, 04:29 PM
  3. By adidamps2 in forum Training Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-08-2011, 08:34 AM
  4. By Anaboliking in forum Anabolic Steroid Forum
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 11-01-2008, 09:44 PM
  5. By iron addict in forum Training Forum
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-30-2005, 04:19 PM
Tags for this Thread
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  

3Js Nutrition Network

juicepump







need to build muscle





3Js Nutrition Network



health and fitness talk