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  1. #1
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    Got injured today, need some advice
    After a long layoff, I returned to the gym 2 months ago but since its been so cold and Ive been getting sick so much, I quit for a little bit but then started up again 2 days ago. Today I did deads, havent done them in a long time, was fine, then i went to do GM's real light, was fine. When I got to rows, on my last rep for my last set (last planned rep, too), I felt a sharp pain in my low back. I must have rounded my back when I pulled it. I didn't stretch it much either which is also my fault. I did not use a belt and normally do which keeps my back flat. I read a post here that says you should not use a belt all the time so I didnt and heres what I get. It wasnt even that much weight but i've never been injured and this is really depressing me. What can I do now to promote healing, I think I'm done with PLing or training my deads/squats so much, I can't afford to injure myself like that. Im never doing barbell rows ever again. I always felt that BB rows put me in a vulnerable position. I'm nervous to see what kind of pain I'm going to be in when I wake up tomorrow morning. I even feel something in my upper right ham.

  2. #2
    Community Veteran Mudge's Avatar
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    I love barbell rows, they are my staple back movement (of course deads are very important too). Maybe they don't work for some people, IMO for the most part - you just have to find the EXACT position that works for you. This also goes for how you get into position for the set, walking around with 300-400 pounds can be risky in itself.
    He who overcomes others has force; He who overcomes himself is strong. Lao-tzu

  3. #3
    IRON ADDICT BIGFOOD's Avatar
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    I love the bb rows as well and have been doing them for awhile as part of my back routine. Even now I have to take my time and get comfortable with this movement, i find it awkward, so I make sure I concentrate and get the form right. I only go as heavy where I don't have to force myself in keeping good form. I wouldn't ditch the rows. I believe it's one of the must do's for the back, along with the deads. Maybe next time strectch a bit more, loosen up your back with some other movements.

  4. #4
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    it feels alot better today. i think i just need to loosen up my back by stretching much more. but i can also do one arm db rows instead. for now i need to heal and build the low back. i think im going to do hyperextensions when i feel better.

  5. #5
    Pro Bodybuilder Mr.SUST's Avatar
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    find a substitute for the rows for now, hammer strength rows come to mind. at least til you heal, but i would keep the bb rows.....if you choose not to wear a belt, make sure to stay tight at all times. good form is better than weights.

  6. #6
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    I agree form is better than weights. As an update, each day it gets better. Ive been stretching out my low back and hams. I think my low back is just weak, from not training it. I would squat, dead, row, train abs, etc but I neglected hypers, pull-throughs, GM's and since always wearing a belt, my low back just stayed weak. Also in the last 2 months since i returned i deadlifted only twice, resulting in an even weaker back. I think tomorrow I will be doing hypers and pullthroughs light to build my low back and focus on my chest, shoulders and arms since they're lagging anyway.

  7. #7
    Never get comfortable maverickLA's Avatar
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    Try to do a dynamic warm up for your back instead of static stretching before lifting. Static stretching before performance takes your muscles out of optimal length. Your much more likely to strain to tear one this way.

  8. #8
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    Oh defiinitely, like a BW warm up right? I just finished right now at home doing BW squats, sumo deads and pull-throughs and really feel a good pump in my quads, inner quads, hams, and ESPECIALLY low back. I put more an emphasis on the low back for pull-throughs rather than hams. I havent felt a pump like this in a while. I neglected my low back but I'm glad that it isn't anything major that happened. I think Tues or Wed I will start adding some hypers and resistance to my pull-throughs done slowly to build up my low back. After 2-3 weeks, I think I can resume training my squats/deads but with light weight and working up. NO more BB rows for me. I can never get comfortable with those and as I mentioned earlier, always feel vulnerable in that position. BTW I never stretch a cold muscle, I always do a real light warm up set but I think I might have to do 5 minutes treadmill or bike to warm up then do my dynamic warm ups before stretching. I don't lift light.
    Last edited by yeahbuddeh!; 01-27-2008 at 04:35 PM.

  9. #9
    Never get comfortable maverickLA's Avatar
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    I wasn't saying warm up before static stretching, I was saying don't static stretch before you lift. You'll find a large drop in performance due to loss of optimal length of the muscle. It cannot contract full force, however - easily put, in it's attempt to you may find yourself straining the muscle. Save the static for after the workout. Dynamic and possibly active stretching before hand, however I don't feel active it good before a workout either.

  10. #10
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    I read up on both stretches. I used to stretch for like 5-10 seconds each leg, back, arms, anything really, and also between sets as well. Do you advise against this? I do feel like if I don't stretch between sets, I might actually lift more.

    I visited this site for the dynamics
    http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com...stretches.html

    I think a good dynamic stretch for a squat/dead workout would be some BW hyperextensions 10-15 reps or pull-thrus with a mini band or real light cable. That would really be great. Add the "full back stretch" in the link above with the knees to the chest in a rolling fashion and I think that should be enough for the low back and hams.

    What should be done for chest/tris workouts, shoulder workouts and for the quads? Would BW squats be sufficient for the quads along with the "full back stretch"? Sometimes I feel a good set or two of BW squats really pump up my quads and sometimes feel harder than weights. LOL.
    Last edited by yeahbuddeh!; 01-28-2008 at 12:55 AM.

  11. #11
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    your talking about your back, i would def go and get it checked out by a doctor. If its nothing major just focus on the aforementioned stretching and i think you'll be fine. With regards to a belt, its better not to use one, however you have to mind your form as well. ESPECIALLY with these kinds of exercises. However I believe the rule of thumb is anything over 80 percent of your max you should belt up. If you always use a belt your core is going to be shot. Personally I only use a belt for my last two or three sets of deads when im going very heavy.

  12. #12
    Never get comfortable maverickLA's Avatar
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    THE HYBRID WARM-UP

    East Coast versus West Coast

    The most abused or overlooked component of any fitness program is a proper warm up. Most athletes might halfheartedly jog for a few minutes or hold a few stretches and call it good. Conversely, if you ever have the chance to train a professional or Olympic athlete you might be lucky just to last through their warm up. For example, the Active Dynamic Warm up is what every athlete undergoes at the Parisi Speed School headquarters in New Jersey. Movement Preparation is what every athlete undergoes at the Athletes’ Performance headquarters in Arizona. Both sports training destinations rank high on the “must do” list of most amateur and professional athletes. At anytime you can walk into either location and you’ll see a smorgasbord of pros training side by side…it’s quite a sight to see. Since I have trained at both locations and found both warm-ups to be very effective, I figured there had to be a way to combine the two to produce a world class warm-up that any athlete could benefit from. So that is exactly what we are going to do calling our warm-up “The Hybrid” warm-up. This warm-up is very specific, has a purpose behind each move and each requires great attention to detail. The Hybrid warm-up increases muscle temperature and will improve muscle function (flexibility, contractibility and force production). The Hybrid warm-up matches the demands of the athletes’ activities paying mind to the movements and joint ranges required in your hips, spine and shoulders. The Hybrid warm-up movements and drills work on coordination, balance and should be performed prior to workouts or outdoor activity. We prefer the movements to be linked consecutively to keep heart rate elevated keeping muscle tissues heated and primed for exercise. This warm-up will contribute to your injury resistance and can be considered a quick workout if you’re short on time!

    If you’ve had any experience in sports or training, you’ve probably done some stretching. Fortunately we were all shown at a young age that we need to stretch in order to prevent injury, although much of what remember is out of date and really not too helpful. Stretching is viewed as a precursor to working out and not surprisingly, most people approach stretching routines halfheartedly.

    With The Hybrid warm-up we’re stretching actively. We’re not holding a stretch for 20 or 30 seconds; we’re using our body and gravity to take us to new ranges of motion. We want to prepare out bodies for the same types of movements we’re going to encounter in daily life, in sports, and beyond. That’s not to say there is no value in traditional “static” stretching because there are times when it’s utilized in our training program - but only when the entire workout has been completed. Muscle tissue is similar to a rubber band; a warm rubber band stretches a lot further than a cold one, right? So it’s best to stretch when the body is warm – after training.

    We’ve replaced pre-workout static stretching with “The Hybrid” which is a series of movements that are the cornerstone of our program. In fact, if you were to incorporate just one component of the Program We would want it to be “The Hybrid” because it provides so much value in so little time.

    The Hybrid Warm-up prepares the body for movement, boosts heart rate and core temperature, which increases neural activity between the brain and the muscles. It also improves muscle “viscosity,” the ability to contract and produce greater force. The main perk of a thorough warm-up is improvement of long-term mobility and flexibility of muscles which means they will actually remember those ranges of motion, not to mention your injury potential will plummet. Active dynamic stretching is the practice of lengthening the muscle (active elongation) and contracting through the new range of motion. To assist the stretch, the body uses either its own weight plus gravity or a process called reciprocal inhibition, where it’s able to get one muscle to fire and the opposite muscle to relax. Every muscle group has an opposite muscle group and their relationship is what helps us produce and control movement. For example, the bicep and triceps oppose each other just the way necessary to control motion.

    With traditional static stretching, you’re doing a lot of pulling. In The Hybrid, you’re going to be contracting your muscles, which is to say activating them by squeezing them. For example, most folks who sit at length during the work week often times have decrease neural communication from their brain to their muscles. Your gluteal musculature is one of those muscle groups that often get “shut-off” from lack of recruitment and prolonged periods of sedentary sitting. This will sound funny, but take a moment and squeeze your butt cheeks one at a time. Easy right? However, most people, even active athletes, rarely activate their glutes resulting in a missed opportunity of utilizing these powerful muscles that should be a big part of everyday movement. Instead, we spend most of our time sitting on our glutes, which cause tightening of the hip flexors (the gluteal’s counterpart). This relationship of these opposing muscle groups, how they interact with one firing and the other relaxing, and the balance between the two groups is part of reciprocal inhibition that we already spoke of. With The Hybrid, we’re going to put reciprocal inhibition to work.

    If you’ve played multiple sports growing up are currently playing multiple sports then you’ve encountered a variety of movements that challenge your balance and stability. For example, how well your body reacts to that wet grass when you try to make a cut depends on your proprioception; the system of pressure sensors in the joints, muscles and tendons that your body uses to monitor and maintain balance. The Hybrid warm-up tunes your sense of proprioception and will give you an advantage come your next competition. If you’re like us, every advantage you can capitalize on gets you that closer to that performance of a lifetime.

    We will generally perform 10 repetitions of each of these exercises, so it will feel like part of your workout, not just a boring precursor to the real thing. And since these movements mirror the same movements of sports, you’ll be better prepared for either your workout and better equipped for the movements required of everyday life and any sport!

    I’ve hand picked the following moves to get your body back into alignment and prepared for excellent exercise. Enjoy!
    Hyrbid Warm-up (perform each move consecutively and pay attention to form and each move’s instruction):

    Callisthenic DYNAMIC

    PRISONER SQUATS

    * Your Objective: Athlete should stand with feet wider than shoulders, hands behind the head with interlocked fingers, sit back while bending at the knees, shins stay vertical, and weight on heels. Your tempo should be fairly fast (1-0-1)
    * Where you should feel it: Your quadriceps should start to fill up with blood.
    * Goal: Perform 10 repetitions before moving onto Jumping Jacks.

    JUMPING JACKS

    * Your Objective: Begin with feet together and the arms at the side. Jump the feet apart to the side wider than shoulder length. Abduct arms overhead elbows straight, return to start position. Keep the knees and elbows fully extended and the ankle dorsiflexed.
    * Where you should feel it: You should feel it in your shoulders and legs
    * Goal: Perform 10 repetitions before heading right into Seal Jacks

    SEAL JACKS

    * Your Objective: Begin with feet together and hands together in front at shoulder height. Jump by splitting the feet and fully horizontally abducting the arms. Return to the initial position. Keep the knees and elbows fully extended and the ankles dorsiflexed
    * Where you should feel it: You should feel a stretch in the chest and blood pumping in your legs
    * Goal: Perform 10 repetitions before heading right into Crosses

    CROSSES

    * Your Objective: Begin with feet shoulder width apart and arms horizontally abducted. Jump so the right leg crosses over the left and arms cross midline. Return to initial position and then reverse the arms and legs. Keep the knees and elbows extended and ankles dorsiflexed.
    * Where you should feel it: in your shoulders and legs
    * Goal: Perform 10 repetitions before heading right into the Pogo series

    JACKHAMMERS (LOW)

    * Your Objective: Begin standing with legs together and arms at sides. Stay in rigid position, keep your abdominal tight, and jump keeping limbs extended. Maintain dorsiflexion and quickly leave ground after landing. Frequency is the key and your elevation from the ground should not exceed more than about two inches.
    * Where you should feel it: In the front of your shins, abdominals, and a little bit in your arms
    * Goal: Perform 30-50 touches in about ten seconds before heading right into the High Pogos

    HIGH POGO JUMPS

    * Your Objective: Begin standing with legs together and arms at sides. Load at the hips and knees and extend at the ankle jumping into the air. Stay rigid during flight and pull your toes towards your shins (dorsiflexed) until you land. Jumps are to be consecutive with minimal time on the ground. The arms are encouraged to aid in propulstion.
    * Where you should feel it: This explosive movement will tax your quadriceps, hamstrings and calves.
    * Goal: Perform 10 jumps consecutively and land softly on the last jump into an athletic position and hold briefly before heading right into Wide Outs. Note: many athletes do NOT practice the landing position and in the Sportsman’s program we encourage all participants to pay attention to deceleration as much as they would for acceleration

    WIDE OUTS

    * Your Objective: Begin in a squat position with the knees together. While in squat position, jump and open legs past shoulder width. Feet stay pointed forward and the head should not change height. Return to the initial position and repeat.
    * Where you should feel it: Your quadriceps will undoubtedly!
    * Goal: Perform as many touches as possible over the course of ten seconds before heading right into Gate Swings

    GATE SWINGS

    * Your Objective: Begin in the squat position with the knee together. Stay in the squat, jump and open the legs feet and knees point out. Focus is the stretch across the groin muscles, head stays level
    * Where you should feel it: Your quadriceps and groin.
    * Goal: Perform 10 full repetitions before heading right into Mt. Climbers.

    MOUNTAIN CLIMBERS

    * Your Objective: Begin in the push-up position. Jump only one foot forward on the inside of the elbows. On the return of that foot, the other foot then alternates into forward position. Focus on low hips and executing full hip flexion and extension
    * Where you should feel it: Your core will be fired the entire time as well as your hip flexors and quadriceps.
    * Goal: Perform 10 repetitions each leg before heading right into Groiners

    GROINERS

    * Your Objective: Begin in the push-up position. Jump only one foot maximally forward with foot outside the hand. On return of that foot, the other foot alternates into outside position. Focus is on maintaining straight body position and hips low
    * Where you should feel it: You will feel a great stretch in your groin and hip flexors
    * Goal: Perform ten repetitions each leg before starting back to the prisoner squats

    ***PERFORM 1-3 ROUNDS OF THE CALINSTATIC DYNAMIC CIRCUIT***

    CORE DYNAMIC

    SUPINE HIP POPS

    * Your Objective: Begin lying supine with head on the floor; legs bent with feet flat on the floor. Lift and extend hips off the floor while driving the heels through the ground.
    * Where you should feel it: in your hamstrings
    * Goal: Perform ten repetitions with both feet planted into the ground, then perform 10 repetitions with just the right leg, and finish with 10 repetitions with just the left leg

    SUPINE STRAIGHT LEG LIFTS

    * Your Objective: Begin lying supine with the head on the floor; legs straight. Lift one leg through full flexion at the hip and return to the floor. Do not touch the leg back to the floor, maintain dorsiflexion.
    * Where you should feel it: in your hamstrings
    * Goal: Perform 10 repetitions each leg

    TV WATCHERS

    * Your Objective: Begin lying on the side with shoulders, hip and ankle forming a straight line. Keep both ankles dorsiflexed and internally rotate the top hip. Abduct the hip through the full range of motion, use hip abductors not flexors.
    * Where you should feel it: in your hamstrings and hips
    * Goal: Perform 10 repetitions each leg

    INSIDE LEG LIFTS

    * Begin on side, top leg crosses over bottom with top leg foot flat on floor. Bottom leg is kep straight with ankle in dorsiflexion. The bottom leg is adducted maximally with no rotation at the hip

    You should feel it in your hamstrings

    PRONE OPPOSITE ARM/LEG RAISE

    * Your Objective: Begin lying prone on mat with arms extended forward and the legs straight. Thumbs can be pointed to the sky and ankles must be kept dorsiflexed. The left arm and right leg are then simultaneously lifted, keeping both straight. Then the limbs are switched, make sure dorsiflexions is kept.
    * Where you should feel it: in your glutes and lower back
    * Goal: Perform 10 repetitions each leg

    SUPERMANS

    * Your Objective: Begin lying prone on mat with arms extended forward and the legs straight. Thumbs are pointed to the sky and ankles are kept dorsiflexed. Lift both arms and legs at the same time keeping the limbs straight. Try not to let the thighs or arms touch the ground between reps.
    * Where you should feel it: You should feel it in your glutes and lower back

    FIRE HYDRANTS

    * Your Objective: Begin kneeling with hands on the floor and both ankles dorsiflexed. Keep the hands under the shoulders and the knees under the hips. The shoulders and hips are kept square and parallel to the ground. Keep the knee bent so the calf touches the hamstring. Extend and abduct the thigh backward at a 45 degree angle.
    * Where you should feel it: in your hips
    * Goal: Perform 10 repetitions each leg

    FIRE HYDRANT FORWARD / BACKWAR CIRCLES

    * Your Objective: Begin in the hydrant position. Circumduct the thigh so the knee scribes a large circle forward/backward. Maintain dorsiflexion and keep back from rotating and the arms straight. Shoulders and hips are kept square and parallel to the ground
    * Where you should feel it: in your hips
    * Goal: Perform 10 repetitions each leg

    FIRE HYDRANT STRAIGHT SIDE LEG RAISE

    * Your Objective: Begin in the hydrant position. Straighten and abduct one leg perpendicular to the line of the body. Lift the straight leg to max abduction and return to floor but do not rest. Maintain dorsiflexion and keep shoulders and hips square.
    * Where you should feel it: in your hips
    * Goal: Perform 10 repetitions each leg

    KNEELING STRAIGHT LEG RAISE

    * Your Objective: Begin in the hydrant position. Straighten and extend one leg straight back in line with body. Keeping dorsiflexion, maximally extend the leg at the hip above the shoulder. Shoulders and hips are kept square and parallel to the ground.
    * Where you should feel it: in your hips
    * Goal: Perform 10 repetitions each leg

    ROLLOVERS TO SPLIT HURDLER SEAT

    * Your Objective: Begin seated on the ground with the legs extended in front of the body and toe up. Roll back and touch the toes to the floor and roll back toward sitting. Flex both thighs and stretch forward in this hurler seat.
    * Where you should feel it: in your hamstrings
    * Goal: Perform 10 repetitions

    DYNAMIC MOVEMENT
    HAND WALKS or INCH WORMS

    * Your objective: To build stability in the shoulder and core. Also to lengthen the hamstrings, calves and muscles of the lower back. Start by placing your legs legs straight, hands on floor. Proceed by keeping legs straight and belly button drawn in, walk your hands out. Still keeping your legs straight, walk feet back up to your hands. Repeat. Walk back up to your hands taking baby steps using only the ankles (“ankle steps”). Don’t use the knees, hips or quads.
    * Where you should feel it: a stretch in the hamstrings, lower back, glutes, calves and front of the shins.
    * Goal: Perform at least 4 full inch worms unless more is required

    INVERTED HAM STRINGS

    * Your objective: To improve hamstring flexibility and balance and dynamic pillar stabilization. Starting Position: Balance on your left foot with perfect posture (tummy tight, shoulders back and down). Procedure: Bending at the waist, maintaining perfect posture, grab the left foot with your right hand, extending right leg back as you fire the right glute. (You might find it easier to extend forward with both hands rather than grabbing a foot.) Your shoulder and heel should move as one, forming a straight line. Take a step back at the end of each rep as you alternate legs. Your body should be in a straight line from ear to ankle. Keep the back and pelvis flat! Someone should be able to place a broomstick snugly across your back.
    * Where you should feel it: a stretch in the hamstrings.
    * Goal: Perform at least 5 fluid repetitions each leg

    WALKING LUNGE GROIN, HAM, & HIP

    * Your objective: To improve flexibility in the hips, hamstrings, lower back, torso, groin, hip flexors and quads. Start by taking a large step forward with the right leg, as if doing a lunge. Place and support weight on the left hand even with the right foot. Take the right elbow and reach down to your instep (forward leg) while keeping the back knee off the ground. Move the right hand outside the right foot and push hips straight to the sky, pulling the toe up toward the shin. Keep the back knee off the ground. Exhale as you reach the elbow to the floor. At the end, make sure both hands remain in contact with the ground as you lift hips and pull toe toward the shin.
    * Where you should feel it: a stretch in the back leg’s hip flexor and front leg’s glute. During the second part, you should feel a stretch in the front hamstring and calf.
    * Goal: Perform at least 4 full repetitions each leg unless more is required

    BACKWARD LUNGE WITH A TWIST

    * Your objective: To lengthen the hip flexors, quads and core. This stretches everything from the big toe to the hands. With feet together, step back with right leg into a lunge. Arch back slightly while twisting your torso over the left leg while reaching the right hand to the sky. Push back and out of that position into the next lunge. As you lean back and rotate, fire (squeeze) the glute of the back leg. This creates reciprocal inhibition, lengthening the hip flexors.
    * Where you should feel it: a stretch from the back leg through your core, especially the lats, and also a stretch of the hip flexors.
    * Goal: Perform at least 5 fluid repetitions each leg

    LATERAL LUNGES TO DROP STEPS

    * Your objective: To improve flexibility in the hips, glutes and IT bands. Start by standing balanced with arms extended Take a step laterally with your right leg making sure both feet are straight ahead. Squat by sitting back and down onto the left leg, keeping the right leg straight. Squat as low as possible, keeping leg straight and holding posture for 1 ½ seconds. Return back to starting position and then reach right leg back about two feet to the outside of the left foot, toe pointing to left heel. Square the hips, shoulders and feet back up, with chest up, tummy tight and majority of weight on left leg. Drop into a full squat by sitting hips back and down, keeping the left heel on the ground. Drive hard off the left leg, stand back up and repeat, moving to your left for the allotted number of reps. Switch legs. Turn hips to drop leg behind. Keep toes pointed straight, with the back toe to the front heel.
    * Where you should feel it: a stretch in the hips, glutes and IT bands.
    * Goal: Perform 5 fluid repetitions each leg

    SUMO SQUAT TO STAND

    * Your objective: To improve flexibility in the hamstring, groin, ankle and lower back. Start by standing tall, feet outside the hips. Bend at the waist, grabbing under your big toes. Keeping arms straight, pull hips down to between your ankles and lift chest up. Tuck your chin and stand straight, holding onto the toes as you straighten out your hips. Hold onto your toes at the bottom of the movement. Pull your chest up, your shoulders back and down, and try to drive the hips forward to get your torso vertical, not horizontal.
    * Where you should feel it: a stretch in the groin, glutes, and lower back and, to a lesser degree, the ankles.
    * Goal: Perform 5 fluid repetitions

    Once you’ve complete the Hybrid warm up you will feel prepared for exercise and chances are you’ve broken a pretty good sweat! Your technique is extremely critical in each move so be sure to watch the accompanying DVD that goes over each move with great detail. The Hybrid warm-up lengthens muscles like in traditional stretching, but the difference is those muscles will contract through these new motions, giving you mobility, strength and stability in addition to flexibility. Most importantly, they’ll stay that way because we’re going to make sure that those muscles stay at their optimal length throughout this program. Your posture, alignment, and muscle elasticity have reached a new level and you’re ready to take on the workout! Let’s get to work!
    I unfortunately do not have the reference on this.

  13. #13
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    Thats a ton of stuff to do just before a workout! Are you sure ALL those are necessary?

  14. #14
    Never get comfortable maverickLA's Avatar
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    No - they are not ALL necessary. There are titles on the sections that apply to the body part you are working on. Generally - for your situation I would concentrate on the core dynamics. You can pick and choose the ones that feel of most benefit to your situation. However - do more than one set and at high intensity - these are meant to bring up your core temperature and get you sweating. Work hard with these and all of your lifts will improve.

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    Thanks alot. Im definitely going to these and save the static stuff for after my training. So this means no stretching between sets right? I always thought it was overkill.

  16. #16
    Never get comfortable maverickLA's Avatar
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    Yes, try to avoid static stretching between sets. Usually the tightness you are feeling is the increased bloodflow (pumps). If you can put your muscles into a relaxed position to help some of the blood move out of the area you will find a little relief from "the pump". However - if you circuit train, each exercise should draw tension from the previous. If you don't - just find that relaxed position for the body part between sets.

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    Thanks. Went in today for some pull-thrus and hypers. Ive never done hypers before and they are better than pull-thrus, even though I did only BW and I used the cable for pull-thrus. I should probably use more weights for that but the hypers gave me a real good pump in the low back and felt great. On another note, when do you think I can start sled dragging? I am wanting to replace cardio with that. 2x/week to start. Backwards and forwards.

  18. #18
    Never get comfortable maverickLA's Avatar
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    Give it another 3 weeks to let your back recover and begin to strength before you put that kind of work on it. Sprinting with resistance is a heavy workload for the muscles, it will be working the muscles in a different way then your weight training. Wait until your are fully recovered and you have built some strength in the back.

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    Well I wasn't planning on sprinting with it, although I do know some do. I was only planning to drag it with a squat hip belt http://www6.mailordercentral.com/iro...sp?number=1220

    or just by hand dragging backwards with a harness with loops. Right now Im doing my upper body, cavles and my core ---> Hypers, pull-thrus, abs, etc.

  20. #20
    Never get comfortable maverickLA's Avatar
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    Then I would definately give it at least that amount of time to recover. If your going to be dragging hand dragging a sled backwards - you will need to be in full recovery.

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3Js Nutrition Network

juicepump















mr supps







mr supps