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  1. #1
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    Default Night time asprin/reduces blood pressure
    Night time asprin/ Reduces BP
    Originally posted on cutting edge muscle


    Night Time Aspirin Regimen Found to Reduce Blood Pressure
    A DGReview of :"Administration Time-Dependent Effects of Aspirin on Blood Pressure in Untreated Hypertensive Patients"
    Hypertension

    06/04/2003
    By Jill Taylor


    Patients with mild hypertension experienced a significant reduction in blood pressure as the result of regularly taking aspirin before bed, according to a new study.

    To investigate the effect of aspirin taken at different times of the rest-activity cycle, Ramon C. Hermida, Ph.D., of Bioengineering and Chronobiology Laboratories, University of Vigo, Campus Universitario, Spain, and colleagues studied a group of 100 volunteers with untreated mild essential hypertension.

    Study participants included 34 men and 66 women, ages 23 to 79 years. The entire group received nonpharmacological hygienic-dietary recommendations, including regular aerobic exercise, restrictions on sodium and alcohol consumption, and information on the Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension Diet.

    Researchers randomly assigned participants to 3 subgroups, which received a regimen of no aspirin, 100 mg aspirin after waking, or 100 mg aspirin before sleeping.

    Evaluation by blood pressure monitoring occurred for 48 consecutive hours for all participants at baseline and after completion of three-months of their prescribed regimen. Each participant received an ambulatory monitoring device during the monitoring periods. Automatic measurements for systolic blood pressure, mean arterial blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate occurred every 20 minutes between 7:00 a.m. and 11:00 p.m., and every 30 minutes at night.

    No significant differences existed between subgroups for blood pressure or heart rate at baseline. However, researchers noted highly significant changes to blood pressure between groups after the 3-month treatment period. The subgroup following a regimen of evening aspirin administration showed a reduction in the 24 hour mean of 6.2 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure and 4.1 mm Hg in diastolic blood pressure.

    While 85% of this subgroup experienced a reduction of blood pressure, the effect was not evident for the subgroups receiving no aspirin or morning administration.

    In addition, results indicate that administration of aspirin prior to rest may be valuable therapy for patients unable or unwilling to exercise or adhere to dietary restrictions. All subgroups reported poor compliance to nonpharmacological hygienic-dietary recommendations.
    Hypertension 2003 May 5:[epub ahead of print]. "Administration Time-Dependent Effects of Aspirin on Blood Pressure in Untreated Hypertensive Patients"

  2. #2
    Olympian Bodybuilder Ozzy27's Avatar
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    I think I'll be taking an aspirin every night now , since juice raises blood pressure. Anything to be safe.

  3. #3
    Junior Bodybuilder iron's Avatar
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    GOOD TO READ!

  4. #4
    I am banned! Drveejay11's Avatar
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    Nice post Lifts

    I DO caution people NOT to actually utilize this practice of ED Aspirin use. It CAN be potentially harmful to the kidneys (and somewhat to the liver).

    AS bb'ers, we take these organs enough as it is and IMO there are better SAFER choices for naturally lowering blood pressure in a comparable fashion.....FISH OIL is a great example of one.

    Fish Oils are a better choice as they contain no known side effects, makes the blood "slippery", increases circulation/lowers blood pressure, blocks cyclo-oxygenase, improves skin, lowers Cholesterol, prevents heart attacks, and potentially raises HDL.

    Read:
    Does fish oil lower blood pressure? A meta-analysis of controlled trials.

    Morris MC, Sacks F, Rosner B.

    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health.

    BACKGROUND. In a meta-analysis of 31 placebo-controlled trials on 1356 subjects, we examined the effect of omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil on blood pressure by grouping studies that were similar in fish oil dose, length of treatment, health of the subjects, or study design. METHODS AND RESULTS. The mean reduction in blood pressure caused by fish oil for the 31 studies was -3.0/-1.5 mm Hg (95% confidence intervals: systolic blood pressure: -4.5, -1.5; diastolic blood pressure: -2.2, -0.8). There was a statistically significant dose-response effect when studies were grouped by omega-3 fatty acid dose: -1.3/-0.7 mm Hg at doses < or = 3 g/d, -2.9/-1.6 mm Hg at 3.3 to 7 g/d, and -8.1/-5.8 mm Hg at 15 g/d. Both eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid were significantly related to blood pressure response. There was no effect on blood pressure in eight studies of "healthy" persons (mean reduction, -0.4/-0.7 mm Hg) at an overall mean dose of 4.2 g omega-3 fatty acids/d. By contrast, there was a significant effect of -3.4/-2.0 mm Hg in the group of hypertensive studies with a mean fish oil dose of 5.6 g/d and on systolic blood pressure only in six studies of hypercholesterolemic patients (-4.4/-1.1 mm Hg) with a mean dose of 4.0 g/d. A nonsignificant decrease in blood pressure was observed in four studies of patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (-6.3/-2.9 mm Hg). Variations in the length of treatment (from 3 to 24 weeks), type of placebo, and study design (crossover or parallel groups) did not appear to account for inconsistent findings among studies. CONCLUSIONS. There is a dose-response effect of fish oil on blood pressure of -0.66/-0.35 mm Hg/g omega-3 fatty acids. The hypotensive effect may be strongest in hypertensive subjects and those with clinical atherosclerotic disease or hypercholesterolemia.

    Publication Types:
    Meta-Analysis

    PMID: 8339414 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



    Another.......


    [i]Blood pressure response to fish oil supplementation: metaregression analysis of randomized trials.

    Geleijnse JM, Giltay EJ, Grobbee DE, Donders AR, Kok FJ.

    Division of Human Nutrition and Epidemiology, Wageningen University, The Netherlands. marianne.geleijnse@staff.nutepi

    OBJECTIVE : The antihypertensive effect of fish oil was estimated from randomized trials using metaregression analysis. Modification of the blood pressure (BP) effect by age, gender, blood pressure, and body mass index was examined. METHODS : A total of 90 randomized trials of fish oil and BP were identified through MEDLINE (1966-March 2001). Trials with co-interventions, patient populations, non-placebo controls, or duration of < 2 weeks were excluded. A total of 36 trials (50 strata) were included, 22 of which had a double-blind design. Original reports were retrieved for data collection on sample size, study design, duration, fish oil dose, BP changes and baseline characteristics of trial populations. Pooled BP estimates were obtained by metaregression analysis, weighted for trial sample sizes. Stratified analyses according to population characteristics were performed. RESULTS : Intake of fish oil was high in most trials (median dose: 3.7 g/day). Fish oil reduced systolic BP by 2.1 mmHg [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.0, 3.2; P < 0.01] and diastolic BP by 1.6 mmHg (95% CI: 1.0. 2.2; P < 0.01). Restricting the analysis to double-blind trials yielded BP reductions of 1.7 mmHg (95% CI: 0.3, 3.1) and 1.5 mmHg (95% CI: 0.6, 2.3), respectively. BP effects tended to be larger in populations that were older (> 45 years) and in hypertensive populations (BP >or= 140/90 mmHg). CONCLUSIONS : High intake of fish oil may lower BP, especially in older and hypertensive subjects. The antihypertensive effect of lower doses of fish oil (< 0.5 g/day) however, remains to be established.

    Publication Types:
    Meta-Analysis

    PMID: 12172309 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  5. #5
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    Anything else besides fish oil?

    Thx
    Last edited by theprofessional; 12-31-2003 at 10:57 PM.

  6. #6
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    I DO caution people NOT to actually utilize this practice of ED Aspirin use. It CAN be potentially harmful to the kidneys (and somewhat to the liver).
    Hmmm, seems the aspirin had twice the effect. You say that you don't recommend it. What about for people that have borderline high BP, ie in the 140/80 range? Is it better than taking a BP med?

    Thx

  7. #7
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    Dont forget that chronic ASA use can cause GI problems too.

  8. #8
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    Good post Doc, as always your points are valid. In studies it seems that a single 81mg baby asprin has all the benefits of the adult 325mg asprin. I am also a big advocate of fish oils. As with any drug we must weigh the risk vs. benefit ratio.









    ANN ARBOR, MI - There seems to be a lot of new attention focused on good ole' fashioned aspirin, so much so that it's recently been touted as a 'wonder drug.' Evidence is rapidly growing that supports aspirin's use in lowering the rates of heart attack, stroke, colon cancer and even Alzheimer's disease. Given its widespread benefits and extremely low cost, the question is raised, "is daily aspirin therapy for everyone?"

    "Although taking aspirin leads to a wealth of potential health benefits for adults, people should realize that even a baby aspirin is not free of dangerous side effects," says A. Mark Fendrick, M.D., an internist at the U-M Health System. "Therefore, in my opinion, aspirin should not be taken on a daily basis without first discussing it with your health care provider.

    According to Fendrick, aspirin use should be based on the tradeoff between the risk of disease you are trying to prevent, such as a heart attack, and the risk of side effects, such as a bleeding ulcer. "Most consumers are not aware of this tradeoff," he says.

    Aspirin falls into a drug class called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or NSAIDs. It's one of the most carefully studied drugs available and has been used to reduce pain and inflammation for over a century. Aspirin's action as a blood thinner saves a large number of deaths from heart disease each year.

    "I think aspirin is currently undergoing a bit of an identity crisis," says Fendrick. "Because it's been around so long and is available over the counter for pennies a day, many people can't believe that aspirin is equally or more effective than prescription drugs that cost over a hundred times more."

    Living up to its reputation as a 'wonder drug', aspirin has been shown in clinical studies to reduce the rate of heart attacks, strokes and related deaths. The ability of aspirin to prevent blood from clotting (makes the cells 'less sticky') prevents these events from happening. Aspirin also helps even if a heart attack or stroke does occur and often reduces the severity of the event.

    "The benefits of aspirin go beyond the cardiovascular system. There is solid evidence that aspirin slows the progression of colon cancer, and some preliminary data suggests that regular aspirin use may prevent certain cancers from occurring at all," says Fendrick. "Also population-based studies report that an aspirin a day will either slow the progression or even prevent dementia, such as Alzheimer's disease," he continues.

    "It appears that most people will get these benefits with very tiny doses - only 81 milligrams a day or one baby aspirin," says Fendrick.

    Since the risk of side effects goes up with the dose of aspirin, Fendrick recommends that most people who are using regular doses (325mg) switch to low-dose aspirin.

    "Aspirin is not benign," says Fendrick. "Thousands of people die each year in the United States from complications related to taking aspirin and other NSAIDs.

    "When you take aspirin, the level of stomach protection is decreased and you're more likely to bleed. Thus, people who take aspirin regularly - even in a buffered or coated form - will have roughly double the likelihood of having a perforated ulcer or bleeding in the GI tract," explains Fendrick.

    "Relatively little attention is paid to this problem that kills more people in the U.S. each year than asthma or cervical cancer," he continues. The risk of stomach bleeding is increased substantially if aspirin is combined with other NSAIDs (both over-the-counter and prescription strength). These include the newer COX-2 selective NSAIDs, such as VIOXX and Celebrex that in the absence of aspirin are safer on the stomach.

    "Ask your clinician if low-dose aspirin is right for you," says Fendrick. "While aspirin is potentially a life saver in many instances and we want to encourage its use, there are also many people taking this drug who don't realize that the risks of bleeding may greatly outweigh the health benefits gained."

    Fendrick categorizes his patients into three groups. The 'must have' group is well-defined and is limited to individuals with a documented personal or family history of heart disease, such as coronary artery or vascular disease, or those with risk factors for heart disease such as diabetes, high blood pressure or high cholesterol.

    The 'probably should take' group is more complicated, says Fendrick. "The benefits of aspirin for preventing colon cancer, dementia and heart attacks need to be carefully weighed by a medical professional against the potential for serious complications," he says.

    Fendrick says individuals who shouldn't take aspirin on a daily basis include those with very low risk of developing the diseases aspirin is used to prevent. "For these people, such as your typical twenty-something reader of health magazines, the well-documented risks of aspirin overcome any health benefits that may be achieved," he says.


    Facts about aspirin:

    Aspirin is acetylsalicylic acid and falls into a class called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or NSAIDs.

    Due to aspirin's blood thinning effect it can reduce coronary heart disease events and stroke.

    Research indicates that aspirin will slow the progression of cancer and may prevent it in the G-I tract.

    Research suggests that taking an aspirin a day will either slow the progression of, or even prevent, dementia.

    Aspirin has side effects including a reduction in stomach protection. When taking aspirin people double their likelihood of having a clinically meaningful bad event such as an ulcer.
    Find more information on the World Wide Web at:

    American Heart Association: Aspirin in heart attack and stroke prevention
    www.americanheart.org

    American Cancer Society: Baby aspirin may reduce risk of colon cancer
    www.cancer.org

    Alzheimer's Association: Fact Sheet: Anti-inflammatory Therapy
    www.alz.org


















  9. #9
    I am banned! Drveejay11's Avatar
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    Originally posted by liftsiron
    Good post Doc, as always your points are valid. In studies it seems that a single 81mg baby asprin has all the benefits of the adult 325mg asprin. I am also a big advocate of fish oils. As with any drug we must weigh the risk vs. benefit ratio.
    BINGO! Good stuff LI

  10. #10
    I am banned! Drveejay11's Avatar
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    ^^^^^^

  11. #11
    Thoms
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    I'm on aspirin for high BP; my dad as well. (not gear-related) I believe it works somewhat; however it only treats symptoms. It's not a cure.
    I believe my dad is on it for over 10 years, along with beta-blockers and other stuff.

    They're called cardio-aspirins, and are indeed +/-80mg. Same as baby aspirins. Nowadays I just break a regular aspirin in 4.

    Didn't know about the timing of the aspirin, thanks.

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